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Keeping your teeth and your gums healthy is our priority. Our team of dedicated doctors at South Shore Prosthodontics will make sure that you receive the highest level of dental care to preserve your oral health at its best.

  • Comprehensive Oral Examination

    Our comprehensive oral examination includes:

      • Medical history review, including the review of any medications you might be taking
      • Oral Cancer screening which involves first an extra-oral visual and digital examination of the lymph nodes of your head and your neck. Your Doctor is looking for pain, tenderness, and flexibility of the nodes. It is then followed by a visual and digital examination of your lips (inside and out), and your mouth (your palate, the floor of the mouth, the inside surfaces of the cheeks, your tongue, and your gums).
      • Low-radiation digital Xrays: digital Xrays allow your doctor to diagnose any tumor or cyst inside your jaw bone . It also allows the detection of decay between your teeth or under some of your existing restorations. If you are or think you might be pregnant, please inform your doctor about it.
      • Tooth-by-tooth decay screening: all surfaces of your teeth and your current restorations will be carefully examined. Our dental team will thoroughly review any problems noted during the examination.
      • Periodontal evaluation: which involves taking 6 measurements per tooth of pocket depths and recording these pocket depths. In this exam mobility of teeth are checked; bone loss is measured ; calculus, bleeding, swelling and recession of the gums are recorded to determine the presence of any potential gum disease.
      • Occlusion analysis: Grinding and clenching are some of the most common conditions that accelerate the wear of your natural enamel. Also an improper bite can generates TMJ problems, jaw-locking, migraines, and fracture of the teeth. Our knowledgeable Prosthodontists will review your condition and inform you of therapies that will suits best for you.
      • Smile Analysis: Because at South Shore Prosthodontics we care about your smile, please do not hesitate to ask us how we can give you the smile you always wanted to have.

    Our Doctors practicing Comprehensive Oral Examination

  • Preventive Dentistry, Fluoride Treatments & Sealants

    Preventive Dentistry

    Both natural teeth and teeth with restorations survive best in an oral environment that is clean and where the intake of harmful foods is controlled. Our program is designed to help prevent new cavities, preserve teeth that have been restored and manage periodontal disease. At the initial visit oral hygiene instructions are reviewed and are reinforced at subsequent recall visits. The following are helpful recommendations for you:

      • Brush your teeth twice a day in a circular motion with a soft bristled toothbrush aimed at the gum.
      • Floss every night in an up-and-down motion while keeping the floss in a U-shape and against the tooth surface.
      • Avoid smoking.
      • Avoid sticky sugary foods.
      • Eat a balanced diet.
      • Use antiseptic and fluoride rinses as directed.
      • Have sealants placed on young permanent teeth.
      • Have sealants placed on young permanent teeth.


    Sealants are liquid coatings that harden on the chewing surfaces of teeth and are showing a great deal of effectiveness in preventing cavities - even on teeth where decay has begun.

    The pits and grooves of your teeth are prime areas for opportunistic decay. Even regular brushing sometimes misses these intricate structures on the chewing surfaces of your teeth.
    The sealants are applied to the chewing surfaces and are designed to prevent the intrusion of bacteria and other debris into the deep crevices on the tops of teeth.
    Sealants actually were developed many years ago, but didn’t become commonly used until the 1970s. Today, sealants are becoming widely popular and effective; young children are great candidates for preventative measures like sealants (especially on molars) because in many cases, decay has not set in. Even on teeth where decay is present, sealants have been shown to fight additional damage.

    Sealants are applied by first cleaning the tooth surface. The procedure is followed by “etching” the tooth with a chemical substance, which allows the sealant to better adhere. After the sealant is applied, a warm light source is directed to the site to promote faster drying. Sealants usually need re-application every five to 10 years.


    For decades, fluoride has been held in high regard by the dental community as an important mineral that is absorbed into and strengthens tooth enamel, thereby helping to prevent decay of tooth structures. In nearly every U.S. community, public drinking supplies are supplemented with sodium fluoride because the practice is acknowledged as safe and effective in fighting cavities. Some private wells may contain naturally fluoridated water.

    What Is Fluoride?
    Fluoride is a compound of the element fluorine, which can found throughout nature in water, soil, air and food.  By adding fluoride into our drinking water, it can be absorbed easily into tooth enamel, especially in children’s growing teeth, which helps to reduce tooth decay.

    Why Is Fluoride Important To Teeth?
    Fluoride is absorbed into structures, such as bones and teeth, making them stronger and more resistant to fractures and decay. A process in your body called “remineralization” uses fluoride to repair damage caused by decay.

    How Do I Get Fluoride?
    Just drinking public water will provide a certain measure of fluoride protection. But for years, health professionals have endorsed the practice of supplementing our intake with certain dietary products, and topical fluorides in many toothpastes and some kinds of rinses. Certain beverages such as tea and soda may also contain fluoride. Certain kinds of dental varnishes and gels may also be applied directly to teeth to boost fluoride intake.

    Fluoride Safety
    It is generally NOT safe to swallow toothpastes, rinses, or other products containing topical fluoride. In rare cases, some people may be overexposed to high concentrations of fluoride, resulting in a relatively harmless condition called fluorosis, which leaves dark enamel stains on teeth.

    Our doctors practicing Preventive Dentistry, Fluoride and sealants

  • Whitenings

    A Whiter Brighter smile

    Regardless of how well you care for your teeth, it is inevitable that, over time, some yellowing or discoloration will occur. This gradual change can be caused by aging, substances that stain your teeth (such as coffee and tobacco), excessive fluoride, or the deterioration of a tooth’s nerve. A tooth whitening treatment can be performed either as an athome, dentistsupervised process or in the dentist’s chair (inoffice). While neither of these methods stops future discoloration, these tooth whitening treatments bring about whiter teeth and help create a brighter smile. Research has shown that the best results are reached when you combine both, inoffice whitening and home whitening.
    At South Shore Prosthodontics, we provide Zoom whitenings, the world’s most trusted and efficient inoffice whitening system. In about one hour and thirty minutes, we will transform the color of your smile.

    Our doctors practicing Whitenings

  • Porcelain Veneers

    Teeth that are badly stained, shaped or crooked may be improved by a veneer placed on the surface of the affected teeth.
    Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain or plastic cemented over the front of your teeth to change their color or shape. Veneers are used on teeth with uneven surfaces or are chipped, discolored, oddly shaped, unevenly spaced or crooked. Little or no anesthesia is needed. Veneers have a longer life expectancy and color stability than bonding, and highly resist permanent staining from coffee, tea, or even cigarette smoking.

    Veneers are usually made by a dental lab technician working from a model provided by your dentist. Veneers are usually irreversible because it`s necessary in most of the cases to remove a small amount of enamel from your teeth to accommodate the shell.

    Porcelain veneers can mask undesirable defects, such as teeth stained by tetracycline, by an injury, or as a result of a root-canal procedure, and are ideal for masking discolored fillings in front teeth. Patients with gaps between their front teeth or teeth that are chipped or worn may consider porcelain veneers.

    Typically, veneers entail at least three appointments: diagnosis and treatment planning, preparation, and bonding.

    During the tooth preparation visit, usually lasting one to two hours, the teeth are lightly buffed to allow for the small added thickness of the veneer. Usually, about a half a millimeter of the tooth is removed, which may require a local anesthetic. During the same visit, a mold is taken of the teeth, and sent to the laboratory for the fabrication of the veneers.

    During the final “bonding” visit, also about one or two hours, the veneers are placed on the tooth surface with water or glycerine on the teeth to check their fit and get a sense of the shade or color. While the veneers are resting on your teeth, they can be adjusted with various shades of cement to match the color of your teeth. To apply the veneer, the tooth is cleansed with specific chemicals to achieve a bond. Once a special cement is sandwiched between the veneer and tooth, a visible light beam, or laser, causes a catalyst to be released, hardening the cement.

    During a two-week period of adjustment that follows, you may notice the change of size and shape in your teeth. It is important to brush and floss daily. After one or two weeks, you`ll return for a follow-up appointment. Porcelain veneers are reasonable facsimiles of natural teeth, not perfect replacements. It`s not uncommon to see slight variations in the color of porcelain veneers upon close inspection, as this occurs even in natural teeth.

    Our doctors practicing porcelain Veneers

  • Silver Filling

    Advances in modern dental materials and techniques increasingly offer new ways to create more pleasing, natural-looking smiles. Researchers are continuing their often decades-long work developing esthetic materials, such as ceramic and plastic compounds that mimic the appearance of natural teeth. As a result, dentists and patients today have several choices when it comes to selecting materials used to repair missing, worn, damaged or decayed teeth.

    The advent of these new materials has not eliminated the usefulness of more traditional dental restoratives, which include dental amalgam. The strength and durability of traditional dental materials continue to make them useful for situations where restored teeth must withstand extreme forces that result from chewing, such as in the back of the mouth.

    Our doctors practicing Silver Filling

  • Tooth-Colored Bondings

    Tooth-colored bondings, or Composite fillings, are a mixture of acrylic resin and finely ground glasslike particles that produce a tooth-colored restoration. Composite fillings provide good durability and resistance to fracture in small-to-mid size restorations that need to withstand moderate chewing pressure. Less tooth structure is removed when the dentist prepares the tooth, and this may result in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam. Composites can also be “bonded” or adhesively held in a cavity, often allowing the dentist to make a more conservative repair to the tooth. In teeth where chewing loads are high, composite fillings are less resistant to wear than silver amalgams. It also takes longer to place a composite filling.

    Our doctors practicing Tooth-Colored Bondings

  • Porcelain Crowns & Bridges


    Crowns are synthetic caps, usually made of a material like porcelain, placed on the top of a tooth.

    Crowns are typically used to restore a tooth’s function and appearance following a restorative procedure such as a root canal. When decay in a tooth has become so advanced that large portions of the tooth must be removed, crowns are often used to restore the tooth.

    Crowns are also used to attach bridges, cover implants, prevent a cracked tooth from becoming worse, or an existing filling is in jeopardy of becoming loose or dislocated. Crowns also serve an aesthetic use, and are applied when a discolored or stained tooth needs to be restored to its natural appearance.


    Bridges are natural-looking dental appliances that can replace a section of missing teeth. Because they are custom-made, bridges are barely noticeable and can restore the natural contour of teeth as well as the proper bite relationship between upper and lower teeth.

    There are several types of fixed dental bridges (cannot be removed), including conventional fixed bridges, cantilever bridges and resin-bonded bridges.  Some bridges are removable and can be cleaned by the wearer; others need to be removed by a dentist.

    Porcelain, gold alloys or combinations of materials are usually used to make bridge appliances. Appliances called implant bridges are attached to an area below the gum tissue, or the bone.


    A tooth must usually be reduced in size to accommodate a crown. A cast is made of the existing tooth and an impression is made. The impression is sent to a special lab, which manufactures a custom-designed crown. In some cases, a temporary crown is applied until the permanent crown is ready. Permanent crowns are cemented in place.

    Crowns are sometimes confused with veneers, but they are quite different. Veneers are typically applied only to relatively small areas.

    Caring for your crowns

    With proper care, a good quality crown could last up to eight years or longer. It is very important to floss in the area of the crown to avoid excess plaque or collection of debris around the restoration.

    Certain behaviors such as jaw clenching or bruxism (teeth grinding) significantly shorten the life of a crown. Moreover, eating brittle foods, ice or hard candy can compromise the adhesion of the crown, or even damage the crown.

    Fixed bridges and implants are often used to replace missing teeth and to correct some kinds of bite problems.

    Crowns and bridges are the most effective procedure for replacing missing teeth or bite problems.

    Our Doctors practicing porcelain crowns & bridges

  • Dentures

    Complete Denture

    Dentures are false teeth, made mostly of plastic, that replace missing or lost teeth. Complete dentures cover your entire jaw, either upper or lower. Some people call them “plates.” Complete dentures rest directly on the gum that covers the bone.

    Complete dentures are custom made for you. The process involves multiple appointments, usually about five. First take impressions of your mouth. At later visits, you and the doctor select the size, shape and color of the artificial teeth followed by appointments to check your bite before the process is completed.

    Complete Lower Denture

    Lower dentures tend to be more difficult to keep in your mouth than upper dentures. That’s because the surface area of the lower jaw is much smaller than the top jaw. An upper denture covers the entire palate, which helps it stay in place. Therefore, an overdenture can be most helpful for the lower jaw.

    Dentures can be either complete or partial. Complete dentures are made for people who have lost all of their teeth. They can be given more support by placement of implants in the bone under the denture. Partial dentures are used to replace only a few teeth. They attach to nearby teeth.

    Partial Dentures

    Partial Dentures are created specifically for you. The Dentures are created to provide a replacement tooth or teeth. The teeth will fit in to the spaces where there are missing teeth. The final result is a smile that appears to be full of beautiful teeth.

    Immediate Denture

    Immediate dentures are dentures that are made for a patient while some remaining teeth are still in place and are delivered at the time of extractions.  Molds and measurements of the mouth are still taken and the patient will have a try-in appointment to see their denture in a wax format.  While the denture can’t really be “tried in”, there may be multiple appointments during the construction phase of the denture.  When the denture is complete, the patient is scheduled for the extraction of their remaining teeth.

    Denture Care

    Dentures today are made from very advanced materials designed to give you a natural appearance.
    However, keep in mind that just like your teeth, dentures should be cared for with the same diligence. This means daily brushing and regular visits to your dentist.

    Regular visits to your dentist are critical. Your dentist also can make minor adjustments that ensure that your dentures continue fitting naturally and comfortably. Just like natural teeth, dentures need to be cleansed of plaque, food particles and other debris. Keeping your dentures in top shape will also help keep the soft tissues of your mouth healthy; an unclean or malformed denture can cause infections and irritation.

    Cleaning Techniques

    Remember to rinse and brush your dentures after every meal, and soak them in denture solution overnight. This also allows your gums to breathe while you sleep. Here are some simple techniques for keeping your dentures clean:

      • People can brush their dentures in a variety of ways. Some people use soap and water or a slightly abrasive toothpaste. Popular denture pastes and creams also can be used.
      • Avoid using highly abrasive chemicals or pastes, or vigorously brushing with hard bristled toothbrushes. These can scratch or even crack dentures.
      • Hold your dentures gently to avoid loosening a tooth.
      • Clean your dentures with cool or tepid water over a water-filled sink. Hot water may warp a denture. A small washcloth placed in the bottom of the bowl will ensure that your denture isn’t damaged if it falls.
      • Soak your dentures overnight in any commercially available product like Efferdent or Polident, and remember to rinse your dentures before placing them back in your mouth.
      • Remember to use a separate toothbrush to clean your own natural teeth, as well as all of your gum tissues. In lieu of a toothbrush, a soft washcloth may be used to wipe your gums.

    Over time, even daily care of your dentures may require them to be cleaned by the dentist. A powerful ultrasonic cleaner may be used to remove hard accumulations of tartar and other substances.

    Our Doctors practicing dentures

  • Teeth Extraction and Bone Grafting

    General Procedure

    When restoration procedures such as root canal therapy, crowns, or fillings are not enough to save a tooth, it may need to be pulled, or extracted.

    Tooth extraction procedures today are far less painful than ever before, thanks to powerful anesthetics and sedatives. In many cases, a patient who has tooth pulled experiences little or no discomfort, and only minor bleeding.

    Before a tooth is extracted, the area surrounding the tooth is numbed with a topical/and or injectable anesthetic such as Novocaine.

    Patients with extracted teeth sometimes need to take an antibiotic, and at the very least, take precautions following the procedure to ensure that infection doesn’t occur.

    Smoking, vigorous brushing and rinsing, and drinking liquids through straws are discouraged during the post-operative period because they hinder healing and may cause the wound to open. Cold compresses applied to the outside cheek near the extraction area can help reduce any swelling and promote faster healing.

    Wisdom Teeth

    Wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars that erupt in the back corners of the upper and lower normal adult mouth. Unfortunately, most people experience problems from wisdom teeth; in most cases, this is because the teeth erupt too close to existing permanent teeth, causing crowding, improper bites, and other problems.

    If wisdom teeth are causing a problem, this could mean that they are impacted.  Impacted wisdom teeth can be extremely painful, as well as harmful to your oral health. Symptoms are easy to spot: severe discomfort, inflammation, and some kinds of infections.

    Many people need to have their wisdom teeth extracted to avoid future serious problems. In general, the lack of the four wisdom teeth does not hamper one’s ability to properly bite down, speak or eat.

    If you experience any of the following symptoms, you may have an impacted wisdom tooth:

      • Facial swelling
      • Infection
      • Pain
      • Gum swelling

    Our Doctors practicing teeth extraction & bone grafting

  • Gum Surgery and Deap Cleaning

    Some cases of acute periodontal (gum) disease that do not respond to more conventional treatment and self-care such as flossing may require a special kind of cleaning called scaling and root planing.

    The procedure begins with administration of a local anesthetic to reduce any discomfort. Then, a small instrument called a “scaler,” or an ultrasonic cleaner, is used to clean beneath your gum line to remove plaque and tartar.

    The root surfaces on the tooth are then planed and smoothed. If effective, scaling and root planing helps the gums reattach themselves to the tooth structure.  Additional measures may be needed if the periodontal pockets persist after scaling and root planing.

    Your bone and gum tissue should fit snugly around your teeth like a turtleneck. When you have periodontal disease, this supporting tissue and bone is destroyed, forming “pockets” around the teeth. Over time, these pockets become deeper, providing a larger space for bacteria to thrive and wreak havoc.

    As bacteria accumulate and advance under the gum tissue in these deep pockets, additional bone and tissue loss follows. Eventually, if too much bone is lost, the teeth will need to be extracted.

    Flap surgery is sometimes performed to remove tartar deposits in deep pockets or to reduce the periodontal pocket and make it easier for you or your dental professional to keep the area clean. This common surgery involves lifting back the gums and removing the tartar. The gums are then sutured back in place so that the tissue fits snugly around the tooth again.

    A pocket reduction procedure is recommended if daily at-home oral hygiene and a professional care routine cannot effectively reach these deep pockets.

    In some cases, irregular surfaces of the damaged bone are smoothed to limit areas where disease-causing bacteria can hide. This allows the gum tissue to better reattach to healthy bone.

    Your bone and gum tissue should fit snugly around your teeth like a turtleneck. When you have periodontal disease, this supporting tissue and bone is destroyed, forming “pockets” around the teeth. Over time, these pockets become deeper, providing a larger space for bacteria to thrive and wreak havoc.As bacteria accumulate and advance under the gum tissue in these deep pockets, additional bone and tissue loss follows. Eventually, if too much bone is lost, the teeth will need to be extracted.Flap surgery is sometimes performed to remove tartar deposits in deep pockets or to reduce the periodontal pocket and make it easier for you or your dental professional to keep the area clean. This common surgery involves lifting back the gums and removing the tartar. The gums are then sutured back in place so that the tissue fits snugly around the tooth again.A pocket reduction procedure is recommended if daily at-home oral hygiene and a professional care routine cannot effectively reach these deep pockets.In some cases, irregular surfaces of the damaged bone are smoothed to limit areas where disease-causing bacteria can hide. This allows the gum tissue to better reattach to healthy bone.

    Meet The Team

  • Invisalign (clear teeth aligners)

    Invisalign takes a modern approach to straightening teeth, using a custom-made series of aligners created for you and only you. These aligner trays are made of smooth, comfortable and virtually invisible plastic that you wear over your teeth. Wearing the aligners will gradually and gently shift your teeth into place, based on the exact movements your dentist or orthodontist plans out for you. There are no metal brackets to attach and no wires to tighten. You just pop in a new set of aligners approximately every two weeks, until your treatment is complete. You’ll achieve a great smile with little interference in your daily life. The best part about the whole process is that most people won’t even know you’re straightening your teeth.

    Sure, there are other options out there for straightening your teeth, but none offers the level of comfort, convenience and confidence that you’ll find with Invisalign®. And no matter what stage you’re at in life, you’ll appreciate how our cutting-edge approach to treatment has minimal interference in how you live, but has a significant positive impact on how you look and feel about yourself.

    Our Doctors practicing Invisalign

  • Night Guards & Sports Guards

    Night Guards

    Teeth grinding, also called bruxism, is often viewed as a harmless, though annoying, habit. Some people develop bruxism from an inability to deal with stress or anxiety.

    However, teeth grinding can literally transform your bite relationship and worse, severely damage your teeth and jaws over long periods of time.

    Teeth grinding can cause abrasion to the chewing surfaces of your teeth. This abnormal wear and tear will prematurely age and loosen your teeth, and open them to problems such as hypersensitivity (from the small cracks that form, exposing your dentin). Bruxism can also lead to chronic jaw and facial pain, as well as headaches.

    If no one has told you that you grind your teeth, here are a few clues that you may suffer from bruxism:

      • Your jaw is often sore, or you hear popping sounds when you open and close your mouth.
      • Your teeth look abnormally short or worn down.
      • You notice small dents in your tongue.

    Bruxism is somewhat treatable. A common therapy involves use of a special appliance worn while sleeping. Less intrusive, though just as effective methods could involve biofeedback, and behavior modification, such as tongue exercises and learning how to properly align your tongue, teeth and lips.
    People who grind their teeth can sometimes develop a serious problem with their jaw, which left untreated, can adversely affect the teeth, gums and bone structures of the mouth.
    One of the most common jaw disorders is related to a problem with the temporomandibular joint, the joint that connects your lower jaw to your skull, and allows your upper and lower jaw to open and close and facilitates chewing and speaking.
    People with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) often have a clicking or popping sound when opening and closing their mouths. Such disorders are often accompanied by frequent headaches, neck aches, and in some cases, tooth sensitivity.
    Some treatments for TMD include muscle relaxants, aspirin, biofeedback, or wearing a small plastic appliance in the mouth during sleep.
    Minor cases of TMD involve discomfort or pain in the jaw muscles. More serious conditions involve improperly aligned joints or dislocated jaws. The most extreme form of TMD involves an arthritic condition of the jaw joint. Traumatic injuries also can cause jaw dislocation.
    In these cases, jaw surgery may be required to correct the condition. Some jaw surgery can be performed arthroscopically.

    Sports Guards

    Sports accidents are common, and a bite guard is especially beneficial to athletes who participate in high-contact activities. It is not uncommon to hear of athletes who have sustained serious damage to the teeth and tissues of the mouth that could have been easily prevented or minimized by a mouth guard. Football, hockey, soccer and basketball are examples of just a few high-risk sports in which participants should wear mouth protection.

    As an added benefit, bite guards are generally composed of materials that are naturally absorptive to force, meaning the guards not only protect the teeth, but may also lessen the force to the entire skull and brain should the wearer suffer an injury.

    Our Doctors practicing Night Guards & Sports Guards

  • Oral Cancer and Cleaning

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers today and has one of the lowest survival rates, with thousands of new cases being reported each year. Fewer than half of all people diagnosed with oral cancer are ever cured.

    Moreover, people with many forms of cancer can develop complications – some of them chronic and painful – from their cancer treatment.  These include dry mouth and overly sensitive teeth, as well as accelerated tooth decay.
    If oral cancer is not treated in time, it could spread to other facial and neck tissues, leading to disfigurement and pain.
    Older adults over the age of 40 (especially men) are most susceptible to developing oral cancer, but people of all ages are at risk.
    Oral cancer can occur anywhere in the mouth, but the tongue appears to be the most common location. Other oral structures could include the lips, gums and other soft palate tissues in the mouth.

    Warning Signs

    In general, early signs of oral cancer usually occur in the form of lumps, patchy areas and lesions, or breaks, in the tissues of the mouth. In many cases, these abnormalities are not painful in the early stages, making even self-diagnosis difficult.
    Here are some additional warning signs:

      • Hoarseness or difficulty swallowing.
      • Unusual bleeding or persistent sores in the mouth that won’t heal.
      • Lumps or growths in other nearby areas, such as the throat or neck.

    If a tumor is found, surgery will generally be required to remove it. Some facial disfigurement could also result.


    Prevention is the key to staving off oral cancer. One of the biggest culprits is tobacco and alcohol use. Certain kinds of foods and even overexposure to the sun have also been linked to oral cancer. Some experts believe certain oral cancer risk factors are also hereditary.

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables is one of the best defenses against oral cancer. Maintaining good oral hygiene, and regular dental checkups, are highly recommended.

    Our Doctors practicing Professional Dental Cleanings and Oral Cancer Screenings

  • Posts and Cores for Root Canal Treated Teeth

    Teeth sometimes have large portions missing due to decay, fracture, the loss of a filling and, in the case of root canal treatment, the creation of an access cavity

    Core placement refers to a procedure where a dentist replaces missing tooth structure in preparation for making a new dental crown. Replacing these missing portions creates the optimal foundation for the new restoration.

    A core can be made out of any type of permanent dental restorative. In most cases it’s either dental amalgam (metal filling material) or else dental composite.

    Here’s the reason why a core is placed. A great deal of a crown’s stability depends on the amount of tooth structure that extends into its interior. If very little tooth structure occupies this space, the crown will be easily dislodged, especially by forces directed at its side.

    By “building up” the tooth first with a core (rebuilding the tooth so it is closer to its original dimensions), the dentist can greatly increase the stability of the crown, and therefore maximize its long-term chances for success.

    What is a post and core ?The difference between a dental core and a post and core is that with the latter, a dental post is used to help to anchor the core to the tooth.

    While a dental core can be created for any tooth, a post and core can only be made for a tooth that has hadroot canal treatment.

    Our Doctors practicing Posts and Cores for Root Canal Treated Teeth

  • Dental Implants

    Before development of dental implants, dentures were the only alternative to replacing a missing tooth or teeth.

    Implants are synthetic structures that are placed in the area of the tooth normally occupied by the root. Implants are anchored to the jawbone or metal framework on the bone and act as a foundation for an artificial tooth or permanent bridge. In some cases, implants can be used to attach dentures.

    Not everyone is a candidate for a dental implant, however. For a successful implant to take hold, a candidate must have proper bone density and have a strong immune system. In all cases, dental implants require strict oral hygiene.

    Implants are so well designed that they mimic the look and feel of natural teeth. Implants are usually made of a synthetic yet biocompatible material like metal or ceramic.

    Surgery is necessary to prepare the area for an implant and place the implant in the mouth. Following the procedure, a period of time is required for the implant to take hold and for bone tissue to build up and anchor the device. In some cases, metal posts are inserted into the implant during a follow-up procedure to connect the tooth.

    Because implants require surgery, patients are administered anesthesia and, if necessary, antibiotics to stave off infection following the procedure.

    Like any restoration, implants require diligent oral hygiene and proper care to ensure they last a long time.

    Our Doctors practicing Dental Implants

  • Digital X-Rays

    Digital radiography (digital x-ray) is the latest technology used to take dental x-rays. This technique uses an electronic sensor (instead of x-ray film) that captures and stores the digital image on a computer. This image can be instantly viewed and enlarged helping the dentist and dental hygienist detect problems easier. Digital x-rays reduce radiation 80-90% compared to the already low exposure of traditional dental x-rays.

    Dental x-rays are essential, preventative, diagnostic tools that provide valuable information not visible during a regular dental exam. Dentists and dental hygienists use this information to safely and accurately detect hidden dental abnormalities and complete an accurate treatment plan. Without x-rays, problem areas may go undetected.

    Dental X-Ray may reveal:

      • Abscesses or cysts.
      • Bone loss.
      • Cancerous and non-cancerous tumors.
      • Decay between the teeth.
      • Developmental abnormalities.
      • Poor tooth and root positions.
      • Problems inside a tooth or below the gum line.

    Detecting and treating dental problems at an early stage may save you time, money, unnecessary discomfort, and your teeth!

    Are dental X-Ray safe?

    We are all exposed to natural radiation in our environment. Digital x-rays produce a significantly lower level of radiation compared to traditional dental x-rays. Not only are digital x-rays better for the health and safety of the patient, they are faster and more comfortable to take, which reduces your time in the dental office.  Also, since the digital image is captured electronically, there is no need to develop the x-rays, thus eliminating the disposal of harmful waste and chemicals into the environment.

    Even though digital x-rays produce a low level of radiation and are considered very safe, dentists still take necessary precautions to limit the patient’s exposure to radiation. These precautions include only taking those x-rays that are necessary, and using lead apron shields to protect the body.

    How often should dental x-rays be taken?

    The need for dental x-rays depends on each patient’s individual dental health needs. Your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend necessary x-rays based upon the review of your medical and dental history, a dental exam, signs and symptoms, your age, and risk of disease.

    A full mouth series of dental x-rays is recommended for new patients. A full series is usually good for three to five years. Bite-wing x-rays (x-rays of top and bottom teeth biting together) are taken at recall (check-up) visits and are recommended once or twice a year to detect new dental problems.

    Our Doctors practicing Digital X-Rays

  • Inlays and Onlays

    Inlays and onlays are dental restorations made of porcelain. In certain cases, inlays and onlays are a conservative alternative to full coverage dental crowns. Also known as indirect fillings, inlays and onlays offer a well-fitting, stronger, longer lasting reparative solution to tooth decay or similar damage. These restorations are beneficial from both an esthetic and functional point of view.

    Inlays and onlays can often be used in place of traditional dental fillings to treat tooth decay or similar structural damage. Whereas dental fillings are molded into place within the mouth during a dental visit, inlays and onlays are fabricated indirectly in a dental lab before being fitted and bonded to the damaged tooth by your dentist.

    The restoration is dubbed an “inlay” when the material is bonded within the center of a tooth. Conversely, the restoration is dubbed an “onlay” when the extent of the damage requires inclusion of one or more cusps (points) of the tooth or full coverage of the biting surface.

    Inlays and Onlays: The Benefits of the Conservative Approach

    Superior Fit: Inlays and onlays offer a conservative preparation that preserves as much healthy tooth as possible. They are a great choice if you have minimal to moderate tooth decay that extends into a flossing area, offering an excellent alternative to full coverage crowns.

    Tooth Color: Boasting esthetic longevity, inlays and onlays are not likely to discolor over time as tooth-colored resin fillings often do.

    Tooth Structure Safeguard: Inlays and onlays preserve the maximum amount of healthy tooth structure while restoring decayed or damaged areas, helping to ensure functional longevity.

    Easy Tooth Cleaning: Because the fit is tailored at all edges and the preparation minimal, your tooth can be easier to clean than it would be with full coverage restorative alternatives such as a dental crown. Composite fillings can shrink during the curing process, whereas prefabricated porcelain or gold inlays and onlays will not (ensuring a precise fit).

    Tight Space Fulfillments: If you have a cavity between your teeth, consider an inlay rather than a direct composite filling. Inlays are better at sealing teeth to keep out bacteria; they are easy to clean, will not stain and offer exceptional longevity.

    Strength and Stability: Inlays and onlays are extremely stable restorative solutions for the treatment of decay. The superior fit and durable material make inlays and onlays a stable choice that can actually strengthen a damaged tooth.

    Weak Tooth Protector: An onlay can protect the weak areas of the tooth. The procedure does not require the complete reshaping of the tooth.

    Inlays and Onlays: The Procedure

    Typically, an inlay or onlay procedure is completed in two dental visits. During your first visit, our doctor will prepare the damaged tooth. A molded impression of the tooth is then taken and sent to a dental laboratory, where an inlay or onlay is fabricated.

    A fitted, provisional inlay or onlay (sometimes known as a temporary or “temp” for short) in the shape of the final restoration will be fabricated during this visit to protect the tooth while the final restoration is being made in the laboratory.

    During your second visit, the provisional temporary is removed and your inlay or onlay is placed. Once fitted, the inlay or onlay is bonded onto the tooth and the margins are polished.

    Our Doctors practicing Porcelain Inlays and Onlays

  • Full Mouth Reconstruction

    Full mouth reconstruction, full mouth rehabilitation and full mouth restoration are terms often used interchangeably to describe the process of rebuilding or simultaneously restoring all of the teeth in both the upper and lower jaws.

    Full mouth reconstruction are best done by a prosthodontist(performing procedures like crowns, bridges and veneers), and can incorporate other dental specialists like periodontists (specializing in the gums), oral surgeons, orthodontists (specializing in tooth movements and positions) and endodontists (specializing in the tooth pulp).

    The need for full mouth reconstruction may result from:

      • Teeth that have been lost due to decay or trauma.
      • Teeth that have been injured or fractured.
      • Teeth that have become severely worn as a result of long-term acid erosion (foods, beverages, acid reflux) or tooth grinding.
      • Ongoing complaints of jaw, muscle and headache pain requiring adjustments to the bite (occlusion).

    How the Full Mouth Reconstruction Process Begins

    If you think you need full mouth restoration or reconstruction, contact us for a comprehensive examination. We will examine your mouth to determine the extent of the problem and the treatment options that can be used to correct it. In particular, we will examine the condition of your:

      • Teeth: The condition of your teeth will determine what restorative procedures may be needed, such as porcelain veneers or full-coverage crowns, inlays or onlays, bridges or implants restored with a crown. In particular, we will make note of any cavities and decay, tooth wear, cracks, short/long teeth, root canal issues and any tooth movement.
      • Periodontal (gum) tissues: If your gums are not healthy, you will most likely need scaling and root planing to treat periodontal disease. You may require more intensive treatments from aperiodontist to ensure that your newly reconstructed teeth will have a solid foundation. Such treatments could involve soft tissue or bone grafts to build up your gums and underlying jaw bone. Your dentist will look for deep pockets, excessive or insufficient gum tissue, periodontal disease and bone density irregularities.
      • Temporomandibular joints, jaw muscles and occlusion: A stable bite – one in which you are not in pain when you close your mouth or chew and one that does not cause wear or destruction of your teeth – is important to your overall oral health. Occlusal changes need to be taken into consideration when your dentist plans your restorations. In fact, you may require orthodontics or some other type of treatment (night guard or bite reprogramming orthotic) to correct occlusion before additional restorative procedures can be performed.
      • Esthetics: The color, shape, size and proportion of your teeth, and how they appear in relation to your gums, lips, mouth, side profile and face, are also important factors in full mouth reconstruction treatment.

    The examination process requires records of your mouth, such as X-rays and photographs, impressions of your upper and lower teeth, models of your teeth that are made from the impressions and a model of your bite. We may also refer you to specialists (periodontist, orthodontist, oral surgeon) for a consultation in order to develop a treatment plan that is best for you.

    Once we have obtained all information relevant to your case, we will develop a comprehensive, step-by-step treatment plan to correct all of the problems in your mouth and complete your full mouth reconstruction.

    What Procedures Are Needed for Full Mouth Restoration?

    Our team of specialists working on your full mouth reconstruction willdetermine what procedures are needed for your specific case.

    Most full mouth reconstructions involve multiple phases and office visits. It is not unreasonable to expect treatment to take 12 months or more, depending on your situation. The following procedures may be involved, depending on your needs:

      • Prophylactic teeth cleaning and periodontal.
      • Crown lengthening to expose healthy, sound tooth structure for possible crowns or bridges.
      • Orthognathic surgery to reposition the jaw.
      • Contouring of the gum tissue to create balance and harmony in your smile.
      • Preparation (reduction) of your natural tooth structure so crowns, bridges or veneers can be placed.
      • Placement of temporary restorations so you can become accustomed to your new teeth and the feel of your new mouth or bite alignment.
      • Orthodontics (braces) in order to move your teeth into the optimal position for reconstruction.
      • Implant placement and restoration to replace missing teeth and/or anchor bridge restorations.
      • Bone or soft tissue grafting to enhance the stability of your teeth, proposed implants and/or other restorations.

    Our Doctors practicing Full Mouth Reconstruction